Liebfrauenmünster

Liebfrauenmünster (1028)

Followers of this blog will have realised that churches show up rather often as photographic subjects. There is something about their grand architecture and often lavish use of materials and skilled workmanship that I find very intriguing. They’re also tricky to photograph without finding oneself taking the same photo over and over again. So I try to experiment with less conventional viewpoints or crops.

I came across the above example in Ingolstadt just last week. This is the catholic minster dedicated to Our Lady and St Moritz. I was travelling light, so only had my camera and the ‘kit’ zoom lens. Having said that, I find that 24mm on a full frame sensor is rather generously wide. I was lucky enough to visit on a bright (though cold) day, and the low winter sun lights up the interior beautifully.

The photo itself was taken handheld as a single exposure. In post, I applied Canon’s digital lens optimizer, corrected perspective, and cropped to a 5:4 ratio. Finally, I used a global curves layer to bring out the shadows. I have never used the 5:4 aspect ratio before. In fact, I remember wondering, when I had just started taking pictures, why our local lab printed enlargements at 8″x10″ rather than the more logical 8″x12″. It was only more recently that I realized this aspect ratio is a heritage of large-format systems. In this case, I used this because it worked with what I had available once perspective correction was applied. The usual 3:2 ratio would have required me to crop down the ceiling, losing the sense of ceiling height so typical of the gothic architecture.

Click on the photo for a larger version; comments welcome, as always.

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